Cabinet of Curiosities

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myampgoesto11:

Helen Pynor: Liquid Ground

Conceived from her research into the numerous recorded cases of accidental drowning in london’s thames river, 
Australian artist Helen Pynor has created ‘Liquid Ground’, a series of large-scale photographs which capture 
various water-buoyed garments expelling human organs from within its floating form. simultaneously haunting and surreal, 
the unexpected injection of internal organs into an otherwise dreamy underwater scene results in a collection of images 
that is arresting in both a visual and visceral manner.

Pynor explores new ways in which we can relate to our body’s makeup by rejecting the celebration of gore and horror but drawing from both personal and cultural stories. utilizing phantom forms, the notion of the human body is approached in a highly sensitive and emotional manner despite the morbidity of the subject matter.

via Design Boom

Helen Pynor gained a BSc (Hons) in Biology at Macquarie University majoring in cellular and molecular biology, a BVA at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney majoring in photography, sculpture and installation, and a PhD at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney. In her doctoral thesis, she sought the reconciliation of materialist understandings of the human body with understandings of the body as a culturally-constructed entity, a theme she continues to explore.

Pynor draws extensively from the writings of scientists as well as philosophers of biology, in addition to working with scientists in both collaborative and consultative roles. Her practice is integrally tied to a questioning of the philosophical and material status of human and non-human organisms. (via)

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Worlds of Sound and ColorPhilip K. Dick in Starlog Magazine
"One of the greatest insights in ancient philosophy was by Pythagoras. He was walking by a blacksmith’s shop. And he noticed that the anvils, when hit by a hammer, the smaller the anvil, the higher-pitched the sound. Wait a minute, he says. These are musical intervals. The sound the anvil emits when struck is a musical sound. There is no difference between an anvil being hit with a hammer and a musical instrument."

Worlds of Sound and Color
Philip K. Dick in Starlog Magazine

"One of the greatest insights in ancient philosophy was by Pythagoras. He was walking by a blacksmith’s shop. And he noticed that the anvils, when hit by a hammer, the smaller the anvil, the higher-pitched the sound. Wait a minute, he says. These are musical intervals. The sound the anvil emits when struck is a musical sound. There is no difference between an anvil being hit with a hammer and a musical instrument."

Filed under philip k dick starlog magazine

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Witness by Troy Moth

The eerie and somewhat dystopian works of Troy Moth in his “Witness” photo series mimics a sort of dreamlike world, foggy and mysterious. The true meaning behind Moth’s work is far less fantastical; the artist’s photos depict a world post-oil spill, directly referencing the devastating impact of such an occurrence on Canadian soil.

The artists work is meant to be a sobering reminder of what could be lost. Moth constructs tableaus of scenes, in which he searches for the beauty among the devastation, hoping, as the artist states, “that the earth is stronger than we give her credit for, and more persistent”.

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com, via artandsciencejournal)